About Quality Engineering

For the most part of my professional life I worked as an IT Specialist in Brazil. An IT specialist is a professional that designs, develops, employs or maintains information technology systems. It is a pretty broad term that may encompass several different different job roles (from database administrators to software engineers to production support analysts). In my case, I was engaged with 2 primary activities: software development and application architecture.

All of that changed 3 months when I left my IT Specialist job in Brazil and moved to Czech Republic to work as a Software Quality Engineer (aka Quality Engineer) for Middleware Messaging products. Since then, a few friends had come to me to ask: a) what I am doing, b) what exactly a Quality Engineer does and c) do you write code. With that said, I think I have answered question ‘a’. Since question ‘a’ is already answered,  let me explain what is a Software Quality Engineer (SQE) and it does.

A SQE is a specialized type of engineer that works on all phases of development to design, develop and execute tools, process and strategies to ensure that software products meet or exceed desired levels of quality (with quality being defined as the degree of excellence of an item or product).

A SQE usually:

  • Design, develop and maintain tools to perform automated testing
  • Develop and maintain automated test cases
  • Elaborate and implement Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD) strategies including its infrastructure and support tools
  • Help to investigate and verify security issues
  • Elaborate and execute test plans
  • Define and implement software quality metrics and design, develop and maintain tools to collect them
  • Review product documentation

Whether an SQE writes code depends on what type of products it works with. For example, in my case I work with tools for messaging and enterprise application integration, therefore I tend to write code quite frequently, as most of these products are used by software developers, IT specialists and IT architects to integrate disparate systems.

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Running Apache Camel within an Application Server

This week I needed to show a colleague how to use Apache Camel, Apache CXF and Spring to create a web-based integration application. To do so, I created a Camel-based implementation of the Simple Apache CXF examples I wrote in 2012. Although this topic is covered more than once on Camel documentation, some details are either missing, which can make it tricky to run this setup this the first time, or are specific to a the application server where the code will run.

Therefore, I created this example (which you can find in this repository in my GitHub account) to complement the official documentation with additional details. I used the open source GlassFish application server to run the code.

Continue reading Running Apache Camel within an Application Server

Development Goodies

These are just some development-related links and articles I have read in the last weeks which I think are worth mentioning:

Understanding webservices specifications (and more)

We all know that JSON and RESTful web services are the new darlings of the Internet and, to some extent, backend development these days. Their simplicity over other mechanisms are, undoubtedly, a good thing. However, a large amount of the backend development still (will continue to) rely on SOAP and other mechanisms to provide services. That’s why it’s so important to understand them. This series or articles from IBM Developer Works can help you understand them:

On the other hand, if you want to understand the RESTful side of the force, you may want to read about Developing RESTful Services using Apache CXF.

Simple Apache CXF: client and server example

I needed a simple example of how to use Apache CXF to create a client and a server to show to one of my team mates and I couldn’t find one that I liked. Hence, I created a very simple and reasonably well documented ones. You can find the code on my GitHub repository. If you’re lazy, here’s the direct link to each one of them – along with build/run instructions:

Happy coding!