Running Apache Artemis with 32Mb of JVM heap memory

As part of the effort to run Maestro on the Minicloud, I decided to tweak the Maestro broker used by the test cluster. The broker component provides the infrastructure for the test nodes to exchange messages. It is used, for example, to synchronize the start and stop of the test execution and share success and failure notifications.

Given the resource restrictions I mentioned on the previous post, I decided to setup a dual purpose node, serving both as a Maestro client and as as Maestro broker. The virtual machine I setup for this purpose has only 1 vCPU and 512 Mb of RAM. At first sight is looks pretty small, but it should be sufficient for running both of the tasks allocated for it.

To accommodate for these resources, I decided to deploy Apache Artemis as the Maestro Broker.  One the cool things about Artemis is that it can run with ridiculously small amount of memory. The low scale of the Maestro Broker means that I can go pretty aggressive with the resource limitations and, as such, I decided go with as little as 32Mb of heap.

The first step to achieve this, is to adjust the artemis command-line for the download package. In its default setting, the heap is set to vary between 512Mb to 1Gb, which would exceed the capacity of the virtual machine I configured. This script runs the code that creates the broker instance, therefore, it’s not necessary to waste too much time tweaking it. Simply adjusting it for creating the broker instance should be sufficient.

This setting is adjusted on ${install.directory}/bin/artemis. The line to be changes is the one with JAVA_ARGS. I have adjusted the heap to a fixed size of 256Mb.

With that setting in place, the instance can be created. For example:

To start tweaking the instance,  the java heap memory for the instance can be adjusted. That is done on the  ${instance.directory}/etc/artemis.profile. Once again, the line to be adjusted is the one with JAVA_ARGS:

That alone should be sufficient for the very low scale of the Maestro Broker. However, given the very low memory settings, it is a good idea to disable a couple of extra things: the console and unused acceptors.

To disable the console we can modify the ${instance.directory}/etc/bootstrap.xml. The trick is to remove (or comment) the web element and all its contents. This is the content that should be removed:

Then, the last trick is to leave only the acceptors that are intended to be used in this broker instance. Since Maestro broker relies on MQTT, that’s the only one that can be left there. The acceptors configuration for Apache Artemis should look like this:

After that, the broker can be started. If you are unsure about the configuration, you can check the command lines using ps or jcmd.

In addition to these changes, the Artemis documentation mentions a lot of other tunnables that can be adjusted. For such a slow scale broker as this, I did not find the reason to adjust anything else other than what is mentioned here.

 

 

 

Making it easy to play with Maestro

Maestro is a collection of tools that can be used for distributed performance testing. It is oriented towards testing of messaging oriented middleware (MOM), such as Apache ActiveMQ and its successor Apache Artemis , but can be extended to other performance test use cases.

Because Maestro forms a test cluster, it requires several components to run and deploying it can be tricky.

In order to simplify the development process as well as simplify it for users hoping to play with and run local tests, I created a set of containers (handled by Docker Compose) that can deploy a Maestro Test Cluster for local testing.

The process is extremely simple and you can go from 0 to the actual test execution in 3 commands (supposing docker-compose is already installed on your system):

1. Build and run the containers:

2.Run the client:

3. Execute a test (within the client):

After the test is completed, just point the browser to http://localhost:8000/ to read the report and view the details.

Additional details about this, such as how to tweak the tests or use a different messaging project, are available in this document within the Maestro Java source code.

 

Simplifying JMS testing with embeddable brokers

Ever hoped for an easy way to run embed brokers and simulate a full cycle JMS messaging cycle? Well, this pet project of mine may be useful for you (or, at least, give you an idea for an implementation). It works on top of JUnit, by providing a JUnit test runner, a JMS provider, a set of JMS-related annotations that will inject object instances and additional utility classes to simplify dealing with JMS. At the moment it works only with ActiveMQ, but adding additional providers should be fairly easy.

Here’s example of the a test class that sends and receives data through an embeddable ActiveMQ broker:

It’s pretty simple as of now, but I can see some interesting uses for running certain types of tests.

You can find the project page here.