Making it easy to play with Maestro

Maestro is a collection of tools that can be used for distributed performance testing. It is oriented towards testing of messaging oriented middleware (MOM), such as Apache ActiveMQ and its successor Apache Artemis , but can be extended to other performance test use cases.

Because Maestro forms a test cluster, it requires several components to run and deploying it can be tricky.

In order to simplify the development process as well as simplify it for users hoping to play with and run local tests, I created a set of containers (handled by Docker Compose) that can deploy a Maestro Test Cluster for local testing.

The process is extremely simple and you can go from 0 to the actual test execution in 3 commands (supposing docker-compose is already installed on your system):

1. Build and run the containers:

2.Run the client:

3. Execute a test (within the client):

After the test is completed, just point the browser to http://localhost:8000/ to read the report and view the details.

Additional details about this, such as how to tweak the tests or use a different messaging project, are available in this document within the Maestro Java source code.

 

MQTT Cheat Sheet

The MQTT (Message Queue Telemetry Transport) messaging protocol is a lightweight protocol well suited for the Internet of Things. It is a simple protocol and an ISO standard. It comes with an extensible reference documentation.

To help me learn about it and simplify my work flow, I created this cheat sheet (warning: PDF) which highlights the most relevant details about the protocol. You can also see it online here.

 

EOY 2016 links

Some links about interesting things I’ve read or watched by the end of 2016. Further comments are provided on each item of the list.

 

Some messaging stuff

Just sharing some messaging tools I have been working with recently.

The first one is this performance test tool: msg-perf-tool. There’s no secret here: you run the tool and it does its best to bring your messaging system to its knees (though this may not be the correct way how to test it … check the testing tips on the Github page). For now it supports only AMQP, but Stomp and MQTT support is on the way. You can find rpms for RHEL/Centos (6 and 7) and Fedora (22, 23 and 24) for i686 and x86_64 on my Copr profile here.

The second one is a web page that can display the performance data stored on an ElasticSearch database and present it in a beautiful way. I call it messaging performance center. Here’s how it looks like:

messaging performance tool
mpt-perf-ui

Some bits are still in progress, but it’s functional.

Lastly, there’s litestomp. A C implementation of the Simple (or Streaming) Text Oriented Messaging Protocol. It was built on top of what-seems-to-be the now defunct libstomp project. There’s a couple of bugfixes, a simpler and higher level API for ease of use. Still a work in progress, but you can download the current rpms for RHEL/Centos (6 and 7) and Fedora (22, 23 and 24) for i686 and x86_64 from my Copr project page on this link.