Making it easy to play with Maestro

Maestro is a collection of tools that can be used for distributed performance testing. It is oriented towards testing of messaging oriented middleware (MOM), such as Apache ActiveMQ and its successor Apache Artemis , but can be extended to other performance test use cases.

Because Maestro forms a test cluster, it requires several components to run and deploying it can be tricky.

In order to simplify the development process as well as simplify it for users hoping to play with and run local tests, I created a set of containers (handled by Docker Compose) that can deploy a Maestro Test Cluster for local testing.

The process is extremely simple and you can go from 0 to the actual test execution in 3 commands (supposing docker-compose is already installed on your system):

1. Build and run the containers:

2.Run the client:

3. Execute a test (within the client):

After the test is completed, just point the browser to http://localhost:8000/ to read the report and view the details.

Additional details about this, such as how to tweak the tests or use a different messaging project, are available in this document within the Maestro Java source code.

 

EOY 2016 links

Some links about interesting things I’ve read or watched by the end of 2016. Further comments are provided on each item of the list.

 

Google Sanitizers and Fedora 25

Here’s a tip if you are using Fedora and trying to use one of the Google Sanitizers with clang and is having problems doing so. One of the common problems is not being able to find libclang_rt.asan-x86_64.a:

This can be resolved by simply installing the compiler-rt package:

Restoring click method behavior on Fedora 25 and libinput

Here’s a quick tip if you need to enable the Software Button Area behavior on an Apple macbook running Fedora 25:

Some comments about this:

  1. You have to run it after every reboot
  2. There’s, probably, a better way to do this. Per documentation, it should be possible to set it up permanently by creating a file on /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d however I did not manage to create a file that works so far.

References:

 

SonarQube 5.6 upgrade

Overall tips for upgrade a SonarQube instance from 5.4 to 5.6 LTS.

 

 

SonarQube database migration: MariaDB 5.5 to MySQL 5.7

Newer versions of SonarQube have stopped supporting MariaDB and you may need to switch to MySQL instead. While I’d rather use MariaDB, I understand that it is not within the supported matrix. Therefore I am documenting the steps here. The steps are focused on RHEL 7 (they probably would work on Centos 7 as well, but I did not test it).

Before start with this process, shutdown your SonarQube instance as well as any other analysis that may access the database.

The first step is to use mysqldump to create a backup of your MariaDB database:

After the backup is complete, shutdown and disable your MariaDB instance:

Then install MySQL 5.7 from Software Collections. The process is documented on this page. These steps are for 5.6, however, you can just replace 56 with 57 in all the steps and the result is the same.

With the new MySQL 5.7 installed and running, create the database:

In the MySQL sheel recreate the database with the same credentials and permissions as the old one:

Then you can recover the backup into the new MySQL 5.7 instance:

Now you can go to your SonarQube server and start it.